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Adopt a Window in the Great Stone Dwelling!

Enfield's Great Stone Dwelling

Built in 1837-1841, the Great Stone Dwelling is the Shakers’ most significant architectural achievement. To plan the building, Enfield Trustee Caleb Dyer sought the best architects in New England. Ammi Burnham Young, who designed the second State Capitol for Vermont and later became the first Supervising Architect for the United States Treasury, was selected to do the job. Skilled tradesmen from Boston were brought in to carry out the construction of the granite walls and slate roof. The Great Stone Dwelling was intended to house nearly 100 Shaker Brethren and Sisters. It was the center of the Church Family, with rooms for dining, cooking, baking, sleeping, worship and greeting guests. The building was soundproofed so that the Shakers could carry out their duties in peace.

Enfield's Great Stone Dwelling

Today, the Enfield Shakers’ Stone House is the Museum’s most important artifact and the center of our operations. In 2006, the Museum launched a $1.1 million Capital Campaign to address utilitarian needs of this nationally significant structure. Donations have funded a new heating system, new electrical wiring and life safety systems, upgrades to the kitchen, repairs to the exterior windows and the installation of new storm windows. Much more has to be done. We will soon be insulating the building. We also need to repair the porch, the cupola, the cornice, and the slate roof.

Help us with these important projects by donating $500 to Enfield Shaker Museum! With your gift, you may adopt one of the 152 windows in any of the four granite facades of the Enfield Shakers’ Stone House. You may make your gift in honor of, or in memory of, a loved one if you wish. Enfield Shaker Museum is a private 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, and your gifts are tax deductible. Contact the Museum at Info@ShakerMuseum.org for more details. Thank you!


Enfield Shaker Museum is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational institution dedicated to interpreting and preserving the complex history of the Enfield Shaker Village and the Missionaries of La Salette.